Case Studies and Six Sigma related Articles
by Dr. Gitlow and co-authors may be purchased directly from the publisher of the journal in which they appear.

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DMADV Model Case Study Article

Johnson, A., Widener, S., Gitlow, H., and Popovich, E., “A “Six Sigma” Black Belt Case Study: Designing New Housing at the University of Miami,” Quality Engineering, Vol. 18, Number 3, 2006.

Abstract: The two methods employed in Six Sigma initiatives to attain a high standard of quality are the define-measure-analyze-improve-control (DMAIC) method and the define-measure-analyze-design-verify (DMADV) method. In this case study, the DMADV management model is used to design a new dormitory concept at the University of Miami.The article's purpose it to provide a roadmap for conducting a Design for Six Sigma (DFSS)

DMAIC Model Case Study Articles

Johnson, A., Widener, S., Niggley, J., Popovich, E., Gitlow, H.,” A Six Sigma Case Study: G.E.P. Box’s Paper Helicopter Experiment – Part A”, Quality Engineering, Vol. 18, Number 3, 2006.

Abstract: An application of the Six Sigma DMAIC model to G.E.P. Box's paper helicopter experiment is described. The define, measure, and analyze phases are covered in this paper. The improve and control phases will be presented in a subsequent paper. The purpose of this paper is to offer a case study for structuring a Six Sigma Black Belt project.

Johnson, A., Widener, S., Popovich, E., Gitlow, H.,” A Six Sigma Case Study: G.E.P. Box’s Paper Helicopter Experiment – Part B”, Quality Engineering, Vol. 18, Number 3, 2006.

Abstract: An application of the Six Sigma DMAIC model to G.E.P. Box's paper helicopter experiment is described. The define, measure, and analyze phases were presented in a previous paper. The improve and control phases are covered here. The purpose of this paper is to offer a case study for structuring a Six Sigma project.

Rasis, D., Gitlow, H. and Popovich, E., ““Paper Organizers International: A Fictitious Six Sigma Green Belt Case Study – Part 1,” Quality Engineering, volume 15, number 1, 2002, pp. 127-145.

Abstract: To clarify the concept and structure of a Six Sigma project, the authors present the first part of a hypothetical Six Sigma project at the Green Belt level. The focus of this section of the case study is on the Define and Measure phases in the define-measure-analyze-improve-control (DMAIC) method for process improvement. The study details preparing a business case with a project charter, the suppliers-inputs-process-outputs-customers (SIPOC) analysis, and Voice of the Customer analysis, and the measurement phase involving critical-to-quality (CTQ) variables, Gauge R&R studies, and developing CTQ baselines.

Rasis, D., Gitlow, H. and Popovich, E., “Paper Organizers International: A Fictitious Six Sigma Green Belt Case Study – Part 2,” Quality Engineering, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 259-274.

Abstract: The final part of a fictitious application of a simple Six Sigma Green Belt project is presented as an educational aid for those interested in learning the structure of such a project. The first part of the case study demonstrated the Define and Measure phases of the DMAIC model. This portion focuses on the Analyze, Improve, and Control phases.

Additional Quality Management Case Study Articles

Gitlow, H., Berkins, A., and He E., “Safety Sampling: A Case Study,”
Quality Engineering, vol. 14, number 3, year 2002, pp. 51-65.]

Abstract: Safety sampling is a management tool for making the workplace safer by studying how processes and people operate. By identifying unsafe behaviors future accidents can be avoided. Rochester Electro-Medical, Inc., a medical-products manufacturer, began a safety-sampling program to improve the work environment and to reduce insurance premiums. Safety-sampling plans were designed to meet the specific needs of the company. Pareto analysis of collected data enabled management to develop a plan to identify and eliminate unsafe behaviors.

Gitlow, H., O’Donnell G., Brown R., Evans D.,  Galindo R.,  Secades R., and Cortez S., “The Business of Police Work”, Quality Engineering, volume 11, number 2, 1999, pp. 287-301.

Abstract: The purpose of this article is to describe a model for setting strategic objectives in a police department. The model uses the mission statement, values and beliefs, departmental and environmental factors, crises, technology, and processes which affect stakeholders to establish strategic objectives. An extensive case study is presented to illustrate the model.

Krishnan, K. and Gitlow, H., "Quality Improvement in the Treatment of Cold Gas Plasma: A Case Study," Quality Engineering, 1997, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 603-614.

Abstract: This article presents the successful application of quality control tools to a cold gas plasma treatment process which improves the surface wettability of a plastic cuvette. It is hoped that this case study will provide valuable insights into the practical use of basic quality control tools for students of quality management, business, engineering, chemistry, and medicine.

Liner, M., Loredo, E., Gitlow, H., and Einspruch, N., "Quality Function Deployment Applied to Electronic Component Design," Quality Engineering, vol. 9, no. 2, 1996-97, pp. 237 - 248.

Abstract: This article describes the evolution of quality management (QM) at Raychem Corporation and the use of quality function deployment (QFD) in supporting the corporate goal, “to delight our customers.” The circumstances that led management to commit to QM and its fundamental principles are outlined. The role of QFD and its integration into the company’s New Product Introduction Guidelines are described through the experience gained in developing a cable television connector.

Gitlow, H. and Loredo, E., "Total Quality Management at Xerox: A Case Study," Quality Engineering, Volume 5, Number 3, 1993, pp. 403-432.

Abstract: This article describes an application of total quality management (TQM) at Xerox. The article is divided into two parts. The first part describes the reasons behind Xerox's decision to implement TQM and Xerox's Leadership Through Quality process. The second part presents a detailed case study of how Xerox employees used quality concepts and tools to increase customer satisfaction. The case study presented in this article was prepared by Xerox employees and represents the type of work that won the Malcolm Baldrige Award.

Gitlow, H. and Loredo, E., "Total Quality Management at Florida Power and Light Company: A Case Study," Quality Engineering, Volume 5, No. 1, 1992-1993, pp. 123-158.

Abstract: This paper describes an application of Total Quality Management (TQM) at Florida Power & Light Company (FPL). The paper is divided into two parts. The first part describes the reasons behind FPL's decision to implement TQM and the managerial policies and practices involved in FPL's effort. The second part presents a detailed case study showing how FPL leadership developed, implemented, and deployed policy throughout the entire utility company. The case study presented in this paper was prepared by FPL employees and represents the type of work that won the Deming Prize.

Selected Articles Comparing Quality Management Styles:

Gitlow, H., "Understanding Total Quality Creation (TQC): The Japanese School of Thought," Quality Engineering, Vol. 7, No. 3, 1995, pp. 523-542.

Abstract: The purpose of this article is to present the Japanese school of thought on quality management. It includes its purpose, principles (assumptions),  techniques, and administrative systems.

Gitlow, H., "A Comparison of Japanese Total Quality Control and Dr. Deming's Theory of Management," The American Statistician, Vol 48, No 3, 1994, pp. 197-203.

Abstract: The purpose of  this article is to present the similarities and differences between two major schools of thought on quality management; Dr.W. Edwards Deming's theory of management and Japanese Total Quality Control. Comparisons are made between the two philosophies in respect to purpose, assumptions, and administrative systems.

Gitlow, H., "Total Quality Management in the United States and Japan," APO Productivity Journal, Asian Productivity Organization (Tokyo, Japan) Winter 1993-1994, pp. 3-27.

Abstract: The purpose of this article is to discuss the quality management movements in the United States and Japan.

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Additional Quality Management Related Articles:

Gitlow, H., “Organizational Dashboards: Steering an Organization Toward Its Mission”, Quality Engineering, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 2005, pp. 345-357.

Abstract: An organizational dashboard is described and demonstrated. The tool can be used by management to clarify and assign accountability for key objectives, indicators, and projects needed to steer an organization toward its mission statement. The intention of the dashboard, which is both strategic and tactical in nature, is to promote management by process, rather than by objective.

McNary, L. and Gitlow, H., “Creating Integrative Solutions in Conflict Episodes,” Quality Engineering, volume 14, number 4, 2002, pp. 581-588.

Abstract:  A review of the literature on conflict management is presented. An operational enhancement to the construction of an integrative solution during a conflict episode is accomplished by redefining stakeholder aims and/or belief systems.

Gitlow, H., “Viewing Statistics from a Quality Control Perspective,” International  Journal of Quality and Reliability Management, vol.18, issue 2, 2001.

Abstract: Many students entering “An Introduction to Statistics” course feel that statistics is a difficult subject that will have limited benefit to their lives. In this paper, a different vantage point for viewing the statistical process control section of a basic statistics course is presented to demonstrate the value of statistics to a student’s life. This perspective has generated extremely positive student reactions for a decade.

Gitlow, H., "Innovation on Demand," Quality Engineering,
vol. 11, no. 1, 1998-1999, pp. 79-89.

Abstract: This article explains how managers can create innovations on demand. Currently, innovations are derived from inspirations or as spin-offs of new technology. Unfortunately, both of these sources are not controllable by management; they happen through serendipity. What managers need is a method to create innovations on demand. This article compares two models for the management of innovation which appear only in the Quality Management literature: one developed by Kano and the other developed by Shiba. Also, the article presents a new model for innovation which is an extension of the Kano and Shiba models, It incorporates the strengths and avoids the weaknesses of both models. Finally, the article presents a detailed case study of the extended model.

   

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